Tag Archive | Visual Arts

Drawing Energy – Book

Drawing Energy describes a drawing-based research project undertaken by the Royal College of Art as part of SusLabNWE (2012-15). The project explored people’s perceptions of energy, by asking them to write, draw or illustrate their thoughts and reactions to the question ‘What does energy look like?’ Over 180 members of the public took part in the process. This site accompanies the book, published in July 2015.

The larger SuslabNWE study saw 11 partners from Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and the UK come together to understand and investigate energy use in the home. At the Royal College of Art in the UK, we looked at bringing together two ideals and practices around inclusive design and sustainability. Both often have different starting points and deal with different scales. Inclusive design usually focuses on people’s needs and capabilities at the domestic scale, while sustainability embraces complexity and systems thinking, addressing systemic change.

Drawing Energy negotiates a space between the two, bringing together people’s aspirations and perspectives with the context of socio-political mandates and changing infrastructure or technologies. The study also moves beyond the idea of purely functional research (such as numerically measuring energy use) to depict the less tangible area of how people relate to energy in a visual, literal or metaphorical way – it takes us from data ‘performance’ through to human ‘perception’. The work represented in this collection builds on a history of using drawing as a tool for research and as a way to enable people to express their ideas and imagination fully.

We hope you appreciate this publication, whether you see it as a strategy within design research, or simply enjoy it for the rich and varied artwork that represent the public’s views of energy.

http://www.drawingenergy.com/

The Metabolic Landscape Perception, Practice and The Energy Transition

Buy Now: UK £19.95 US $29.95

The Metabolic Landscape navigates the disciplines of art, science and philosophy to picture and interpret the planet’s current state of ‘metabolic distress’.

Humankind’s search for more powerful sources of energy to sustain an urbanising existence has created an energy transition that, while hugely beneficial to human existence, is now being identified as a source of harm. Just as metabolic disease refers to energy-sourced medical problems, so too the planet, the authors propose, is showing increasing signs of metabolic distress.

The distinctive approaches of each author/artist within the book allow for a diverse and comprehensive discourse on these emerging themes of progressive ecological disturbance: Gina Glover’s work exploits atmospheric weather and ambient lighting conditions to draw attention to such energetic places and artefacts as coalfields in the Arctic, nuclear installations in France and hydraulic fracturing sites in the USA; Jessica Rayner observes how theories of the sun have varied according to the symbolic or scientific precepts of the day, drawing comparison between manufacturing, properties of the sun and changing theories of energy; and Geof Rayner constructs an accompanying textual narrative which shows how the energy transition has profound evolutionary consequences, not only for external nature, but how we see and interpret the landscape.

The Metabolic Landscape is a beautifully illustrated, fascinating and engaging exploration of the unfolding relationship between energy and the landscape, and our interpretation of it.

Authors
Gina Glover; Geof Rayner; Jessica Rayner

Paperback
128 pages
118 b/w and colour ills
21.0 x 28.0 cm
ISBN13: 978 1 908966 27 8

Paintsmiths visit Heron Road by Felix ‘FLX’ Braun and Jack ‘Dones’

The Scaffolding recently came down on a new mural from Paintsmiths which, for this work, was Felix and Jack Tiernay for Bristol City Council and the Warm Up Bristol Campaign show home over at 56 Heron Road, Easton, BS5.

The mural itself is a stunning piece of work showing off the house itself and lots of examples of the old types of energy and the new sustainable energies that are now available.

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Visit Warm Up Bristol’s show home

We’ve created a show home in Easton so that you can see first hand how you can make your home warmer with energy saving insulation and other measures. Come along and find out what a difference our energy saving measures can make!

Show home opening times?

You will be able to visit the property at 56 Heron Road, Easton, BS5 0LU throughout 2016 on the following days:

  • Tuesday: 9.30 – 4.30
  • Thursday: 9.30 – 4.30
  • Saturday: 10.30 – 2.30

Why visit the show home?

At our show home you will be able to see what energy saving measures can be installed in a Victorian era mid-terrace property. We have installed underfloor insulation throughout the ground floor, new insulation to the bathroom ceiling/roof space, internal wall insulation in the kitchen and bathroom and external wall insulation to the front and back of the property. We have new double-glazed windows that have humidity reactive trickle vents, a passive ventilation unit in the kitchen and bathroom and many simpler and cheaper to install measures including low flow taps and draught-proofing. The show home has been retrofitted with new energy saving improvements by one of Bristol’s SME’s Urbane ECO and was funded via Warm Up Bristol.

Our community partners, Easton Energy Group, are managing the property and will be there to explain the different measures available, show you samples and help you register for our initiative. They will also be hosting other activities such as knit and natter sessions and hosting the travelling seamstress who will help you make your own draught-proofing sausage dog as a cheap and simple way to keep those draughts at bay and make your home warmer to live in.