Tag Archive | Light

Field of Light: 50,000 solar-powered bulbs light up Australia’s Red Desert around Uluru

From Creative Boom on 4th April in Art by Katy Cowan

In 1992, journeying to Uluru through the Red Desert in central Australia, British artist Bruce Munro felt a compelling connection to the energy, heat and brightness of the desert landscape, which he recorded in his ever present sketchbooks.

This year, he travelled back to celebrate this experience through his Field of Light installation – 50,000 solar-powered bulbs that light up a large expanse of Australia’s Red Desert surrounding the famous Uluru, covering an area the size of around four football fields.

Munro recalls: “I wanted to create an illuminated field of stems that, like the dormant seed in a dry desert, would burst into bloom at dusk with gentle rhythms of light under a blazing blanket of stars.”

Having developed the idea for over a decade the first Field of Light was created in the field behind his family home in Wiltshire, and similar installations have since been exhibited across Europe and America. But this year, Munro returned to the very space that inspired him, to Uluru – for his biggest and best installation to date.

The local tribe have named the piece Tili Wiru Tjuta Nyakutjaku in Pitjantjatjara, meaning “looking at lots of beautiful lights.” You can visit the installation and experience the beautiful Field of Light right up until April 2017. Profits for the exhibition will directly benefit the local community.

Via Colossal

441313

E-waste into art by Robb Godshaw

Robb Godshaw makes artwork that is conceptual and, as he describes, “Uses technical means to move things that can’t be moved, or make visible things that aren’t normally visible.” During an artist residency at SF Recology, which houses San Francisco’s dump, Godshaw scavenged electronic waste, most of which was functional. He turned old televisions into microscopes and made a powerful rainbow generator, upcycling e-waste to create illuminated kinetic sculptures and installations. The residency allowed him to expand his use of materials and elevate discarded objects to explore the personal narratives attached to the things humans leave behind.

Find more of Robb’s work here: http://www.robb.cc/

CaQHeQRVAAAS6va

 

Dutch Windmills Host a Mesmerizing Laser Show

It’s literally green energy

by JOHN METCALFE @citycalfe

Mar 14, 2016

Trek out to a Dutch field at night and you’ll find a remarkable phenomenon (and potential hazard for low-flying helicopter pilots): a line of gyrating wind turbines, spitting viridian beams at each other as if communicating in an alien language made of light.

“Windlicht” is the latest dreamy production from Daan Roosegaarde, a Dutch artist who’s also made a virtual, glowing flood and a luminous bike pathmodeled after Vincent van Gogh’s “The Starry Night.” Roosegaarde drew inspiration for the installation from the western village of Kinderdijk, which in the mid-1700s built a network of windmills to drain a low-lying piece of land. (UNESCO has labeled the mills a world-heritage site for their “outstanding contribution… to the technology of handling water.”

Studio Roosegaarde writes of the artwork (which had the support of Dutch telecommunications company KPN):

“Windlicht,” the latest artwork by Roosegaarde, shows the beauty of green energy. Green energy. Everyone wants it, but not in their backyard. An odd thing for a country known for its picturesque windmills dating from the 18th century. How can we once again give green energy the allure it deserves?…

Special software and tracking technology detect the windmill blades rotating at 280 kilometres per hour. Green lines of light are connecting the blades. This creates a dynamic play of light and movement. Roosegaarde [says]: “Windlicht creates the missing link between the Dutch and the beauty of our new landscape.”

Locals can catch the gleaming turbines for free on March 18 and 19 from 10 to 11 p.m.; details are posted on the artist’s website.

Thanks to Alice Bell, Head of communications at 10:10 for sharing this project!