Tag Archive | Book

Renewable Futures. Art, Science and Society in the Post-Media Age Paperback – 28 Apr 2017

With this Renewable Futures volume, we begin a new series of Acoustic Space, that will focus on exploring the transformative potential of art in the post-media age.

Our book presents the research and practices that aim to invent new avenues for more sustainable and imaginative future developments.

The papers from the 1st Renewable Futures Conference selected in this volume are aimed at shaping new contact zones between traditionally separated domains art and science, academic research and independent creative practices, sustainable businesses and social engagement in the 21st century.

The first chapter highlights the role of technology, considering ‘technopolitics’ as a very profound perspective for the contextualisation of an art practice in the current phase of society.

The second chapter introduces the notion of ‘contemporary conditions’ and discusses theories and practices of ‘post-media’, ‘post-internet’ and other ‘posts’.

The third chapter looks at artistic engagement with different fields of science, ecological issues and interspecies relations, while the fourth chapter discusses yet another role which artists have been active in partaking in collecting and coding, manipulating and retransmitting processes.

The closing section includes an overview of the Fields exhibition (Riga 2014), a large-scale post-media manifestation, jointly curated by Armin Medosch, Rasa Smite and Raitis Smits.

Authors and contributors: Domenico Quaranta, Martha Buskirk, Misko Suvakovic, Dieter Daniels, Andreas Broeckmann, Geoff Cox, Jacob Lund, Ieva Astahovska, Karla Brunet, Oksana Chepelyk, Edith Doove, Gabriela Galati, Julian Hanna, Lisa Jevbratt, Normunds Kozlovs, AnneMarie Maes, Conor McGarrigle, Armin Medosch, Jennifer no.e Parker, Daniela de Paulis, Helena Sederholm, Ilva Skulte, Rasa Smite, Raitis Smits, Vygandas Vegas Simbelis, Isidora Todorovic, Polona Tratnik and Fields Exhibition artists.

http://www.acousticspacejournal.com

Buy this book on amazon

 

The Metabolic Landscape, Gina Glover, Geof Rayner & Jessica Rayner

tumblr_inline_nezerhgsuu1qk1n2b

Perception, practice and the energy transition.

Published in 2015, The Metabolic Landscape is a beautifully illustrated, fascinating and engaging exploration of the unfolding relationship between energy and the landscape, and our interpretation of it.
Humankinds search for more powerful sources of energy to sustain an urbanising existence has created an energy transition that, while hugely beneficial to human existence, is now being identified as a source of harm. Just as metabolic disease refers to energy-sourced medical problems, so too the planet, the authors propose, is showing increasing signs of metabolic distress.

The Art of Life – Understanding how participation in arts and culture can affect our values

“We need new ideas, we need new ways of doing things and we need a whole new way of approaching each other with much more empathy and understanding. This means that the rest of society really needs to focus on the world of art and culture as a vital source for not only solutions, but also ways of finding solutions… and a whole new concept of what a valuable life really means.” Uffe Elbaek, former Danish Minister of Culture

 

Last year the Future Generation Art Prize was created to help younger artists participate in the cultural development of societies in global transition. On launching the Prize, founder Victor Pinchuk said, “I believe artists can show our world of tomorrow better than politicians and analysts”.

Can we transition the values of our society and economy within a generation? We surely need to give it our best shot, armed with sharp insight into what makes a real difference.  Our customs, behaviours, and values are by-products of our culture. No one is born with greed, prejudice, bigotry and hatred; these are all learned behaviour patterns. We need to find more and better ways to learn from and understand each other, contest and disrupt vested interests and imagine and create more sustainable ways of living.

Art and culture’s core practice is one of the most participative, dynamic and social forms of human behaviour. It has the capacity to trigger reflection, generate empathy, create dialogue and foster new ideas and relationships and offers a powerful and democratic way of expressing, sharing and shaping values. It can help us build new capabilities and understand how to imagine and rehearse a different way of being and relating. It can enable us to design useful and meaningful things and is increasingly the basis of livelihoods and enterprises that are motivated by much more than financial profit.

But to realise fully this potential, we need to deepen our understanding of how arts impact on our values and rethink how and why we value art. Our values represent our guiding principles, our broadest motivations, influencing the attitudes we hold and how we act. They are the frame through which we construct the stories that we tell ourselves and others about what is important.

In The Art of Life, Tim Kasser, professor of psychology and co-author of Common Cause; The Case for Working with our Cultural Values, sets out the evidence base for the shaping of values and explores the potential of engagement with art and culture to affect our:

·      self-acceptance,

·      affiliation, and

·      community feeling,

As well as values that are known to affect higher levels of personal, social, and ecological well-being such as:

·      freedom,

·      creativity,

·      self-respect,

·      equality and

·      unity with nature.

A number of people have offered their responses to the ideas that Tim explores in his article, including an emergent artist, a playwright, a campaigner, a designer, a director of a cultural organisation, and two academics from different disciplines.  Their generous contributions and critique are fascinating and sometimes fierce.

This report is the beginning of a dialogue about how art and culture impact on our values, what that might look like in practice, and how we might foster new collaborations between artists and cultural institutions and the third sector to create new ideas for development. This is a dialogue that needs lots of voices, and we’d love to hear from anyone who’d like to be involved.

Read ‘The Art of Life’ here.

The Metabolic Landscape Perception, Practice and The Energy Transition

Buy Now: UK £19.95 US $29.95

The Metabolic Landscape navigates the disciplines of art, science and philosophy to picture and interpret the planet’s current state of ‘metabolic distress’.

Humankind’s search for more powerful sources of energy to sustain an urbanising existence has created an energy transition that, while hugely beneficial to human existence, is now being identified as a source of harm. Just as metabolic disease refers to energy-sourced medical problems, so too the planet, the authors propose, is showing increasing signs of metabolic distress.

The distinctive approaches of each author/artist within the book allow for a diverse and comprehensive discourse on these emerging themes of progressive ecological disturbance: Gina Glover’s work exploits atmospheric weather and ambient lighting conditions to draw attention to such energetic places and artefacts as coalfields in the Arctic, nuclear installations in France and hydraulic fracturing sites in the USA; Jessica Rayner observes how theories of the sun have varied according to the symbolic or scientific precepts of the day, drawing comparison between manufacturing, properties of the sun and changing theories of energy; and Geof Rayner constructs an accompanying textual narrative which shows how the energy transition has profound evolutionary consequences, not only for external nature, but how we see and interpret the landscape.

The Metabolic Landscape is a beautifully illustrated, fascinating and engaging exploration of the unfolding relationship between energy and the landscape, and our interpretation of it.

Authors
Gina Glover; Geof Rayner; Jessica Rayner

Paperback
128 pages
118 b/w and colour ills
21.0 x 28.0 cm
ISBN13: 978 1 908966 27 8